If the Earth is Too Flat to be Round

Photo by Nayeon Yang

Photo by Nayeon Yang

If the Earth is Too Flat to be Round,
2016
3-channel live-feed video installation: Projectors, cameras, and Mylar.
Dimensions variable

Photo (above) and video (below) by Dan Shellenbarger

Photo (above) and video (below) by Dan Shellenbarger

If the Earth is Too Flat to be Round is an interactive three-channel video installation using live-feed videos. The space arranged in a U shape with three walls is capped by a half-size, freestanding wall, which closes the space and makes two openings at both sides of the wall to the space. A silver mirrored Mylar film covers the entire floor, giving soft reflections. Three projections occupy the three connected walls, lighting up the space in cool white light that is approximately 5500Kelvin.

Projector A connects with Camera A located on the ceiling and throws projection A. Projector B connects with Camera B located at the freestanding wall between the entrances and throws projection B. Projector C connects with the computer and throws projection C, which is a looping video. All three projected images echo with the floor; the images of projections essentially come from the floor covered with the reflective film, and they are in the same size, orientation, and appearance of a watery surface.

Once viewers enter the space, everything changes.

In the space, viewers encounter their own images on projections turning away from their gazes and expectations. This makes the viewers keep looking at and for the images of themselves as if they needed to confirm their presence through the reflections.

This condition also makes the viewers not look at the others around them even though they acknowledge the others’ presence in the space. Therefore, the others become invisible to “me” [the viewers’ selves]